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1326.005

BLOOD TRANSFUSION SET ''BAXTER'' BRAND, COMPLETE WITH INSTRUCTION BOOKLET IN ORIGINAL CARD BOX

Inscription
U.S. PATENT No.2004027/ OTHER PATENTS PENDING/ 500 c c/ HALF SIZE : PROPERTY/ OF/ BAXTER LABS./ INC/ COLLEGE POINT, N.Y./ GLENVIEW. ILL/ TORONTO CANADA/ BITTLE 'S MADE/ IN U.S.A. 2
Production date
1930-1950
Production organisations
BAXTER LABORATORIES INC.
Labels
It was over the two world wars that transfusion medicine and blood banking infrastructures spread across the world. This current device was made by Baxter Laboratories in the US during the height of the Second World War (1939-1945), adapted for taking blood as well as transfusing it. The sodium citrate added into the glass jar (called a ‘vacoliter’) allowed the blood to be stored without clotting for several days before transfusion. It was also during this time that technology for processing and transporting plasma was developed, allowing blood to travel across continents to reach the battlefields. However such anonymity of donors also intensified existing social fissures (racial discrimination), leading to controversies such as the American Red Cross’s initial refusal of Black donors when it started to collect blood for the military forces in January 1941. The American Red Cross only reluctantly started to accept Black donors in January 1942 while labeling their donations separately to reserve them for Black soldiers. Despite oppositions from Black and scientific communities, such blood segregation continued until 1947 in American Red Cross, and much longer in private blood banks in the American South until blood banks came under the authority of the Food and Drug Administration in 1972. Blood segregation in American blood banks shows us how blood donation and transfusion involved social and symbolic relationship building between donors and recipients and a long struggle against racial othering.

Source: Lederer, Susan. 2008. Flesh and Blood: Organ Transplantation and Blood Transfusion in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Part 1326.005.1

Classification:
4606: Infusion, transfusion
Object Name:
box
Location:
In Storage

Part 1326.005.2

Classification:
4606: Infusion, transfusion
Object Name:
bottle
Location:
In Storage

Part 1326.005.3

Classification:
4606: Infusion, transfusion
Object Name:
rubber bulb
Location:
In Storage

Part 1326.005.4

Classification:
4606: Infusion, transfusion
Object Name:
tube
Location:
In Storage

Part 1326.005.5

Classification:
4606: Infusion, transfusion
Object Name:
manuals (instruction materials)
Location:
In Storage

Part 1326.005.6

Classification:
4606: Infusion, transfusion
Object Name:
leaflet
Location:
In Storage

Part 1326.005.7

Classification:
4606: Infusion, transfusion
Object Name:
leaflet
Location:
In Storage